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Activity for gmcgath‭

Type On... Excerpt Status Date
Comment Post #285294 This isn't a physics question, except in the sense that all questions about physical objects are.
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10 months ago
Comment Post #285238 That's helpful. It clicked after realizing that tossing a ball into the air and having it slowed by gravity is the same as braking, just rotated 90 degrees.
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10 months ago
Comment Post #285233 Thanks, and I'm sure that makes it intuitive to a physicist, but it's not quite what I was hoping for. Something like the discussion of the effects of a collision vs. the velocity going into it might provide more of a feeling for why kinetic energy is proportional to the square of the velocity.
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10 months ago
Edit Post #285229 Initial revision 10 months ago
Question How can the kinetic energy equation be intuitively understood?
Momentum is proportional to an object's velocity, and kinetic energy is proportional to the square of its velocity $\dfrac{mv^2}{2}$. It's pretty intuitive that if object B is going twice as fast as object A and they have the same mass, B has twice the momentum. It's harder to grasp why it has four t...
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10 months ago
Comment Post #285193 I'm very rusty on this topic, so I'm offering a comment rather than an answer. Feel free to correct anything that looks dumb here. In special relativity, there is no such thing as a "rest" frame of reference. All non-accelerated frames of reference have equal standing. But the classic Einstein equ...
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10 months ago
Edit Post #284667 Initial revision 12 months ago
Answer A: What is "order" and "disorder" in entropy?
Order and disorder aren't scientifically precise terms. In this context, they're an attempt to make the idea of entropy more intuitive. A configuration could appear orderly just by chance, yet be high entropy. For example, you could roll a die 6 times and get 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 by chance. That would ap...
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12 months ago