Communities

Writing
Writing
Codidact Meta
Codidact Meta
The Great Outdoors
The Great Outdoors
Photography & Video
Photography & Video
Scientific Speculation
Scientific Speculation
Cooking
Cooking
Electrical Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Judaism
Judaism
Languages & Linguistics
Languages & Linguistics
Software Development
Software Development
Mathematics
Mathematics
Christianity
Christianity
Code Golf
Code Golf
Music
Music
Physics
Physics
Linux Systems
Linux Systems
Power Users
Power Users
Tabletop RPGs
Tabletop RPGs

Dashboard
Notifications
Mark all as read
Q&A

Book suggestion for Classical Mechanics

+1
−1
Since, there's no book category currently so, I am asking it here. And, It can be moved to that category later. I want to start learning now so, I don't want to wait.

Which book is best for Classical Mechanics? I have studied Classical Mechanics little bit. But, I want a book which explains theories step by step (It's OK if that book has GR topic). I want that book to prove formulas (theories) step by step. I had studied some book but, those books don't explain theories properly, those books mostly for solving problem. I had completed most of topic in Classical Mechanics (didn't prove theories/equations).

What I have completed :

  1. Laws of Motion, 2 dimensional motion.
  2. Force
  3. Sounds
  4. Heat (not completely) (little bit of Thermodynamics).
  5. Reflection, Refraction.
  6. Special Relativity.
  7. General Relativity (I just can explain how Gravity works nothing else).
  8. Work
  9. Power
  10. Electricity.
  11. Harmonic Motion

Now, studying Lagrangian mechanism in Goldstein's Classical Mechanics book.


I was reading Introduction to Classical Mechanics by David Morin, that book was little bit hard to understand. So, I am reading Classical Mechanics by John R. Taylor. It's little bit easy (but not too much).
Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.
Why should this post be closed?

2 comment threads

Close reason (3 comments)
Level expectation? (5 comments)

1 answer

+0
−0

For an absolute beginner :

If you don't have any idea of any theories than, I would suggest to study theories at first. Just practice beginner problems at first which contains no-calculus(It's OK if that book contains few beginner calculus). I suggest to read High Schools Physics Book for studying theories. High Schools Physics Book contains most of Newtonian Mechanics's theories.

If you have studied theories :

If you have ideas of theories than you can deal with some calculus problems like deriving some higher level equations. After studying few books, I chose Classical Mechanics by Goldstein. After studying theories while deriving some equations you will understand what's the equation is trying to say how the equation works. That's why you must have idea of theories. You will understand how equations are found how equations work by studying Classical Mechanics of Goldstein. Even, Goldstein had explained easily so that everyone can understand it easily. Some people might scare after getting the book cause, in second chapter they started explaining Lagrangian Mechanics then, Hamilton. It covers lot of higher level theories. That's why I said to study theories at first.

Found another equivalent book of Classical Mechanics by Goldstein. The books explains texture more briefly than Goldstein did. Introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics. There's playlist available in YT

Classical Mechanics by Goldstein : PDFdrive (free PDF)

If you already have read a Classical Mechanics book of higher level :

After studying a Classical Mechanics book, you may want to practice problems. Most of University says to study Introduction to Classical Mechanics by David Morin. It's not very easy. You will become pro in Classical Mechanics if you can solve every problem by yourself. You can study Competitive Physics also for practicing problem. A person said that Competitive Physics is too hard he also said,"If you haven't read 2 or 3 books on Physics than you can't understand anything of the book". But, I haven't looked at that book so I am not saying anything about it.

Introduction to classical mechanics : PDFdrive (free PDF)

Competitive Physics : Amazon

Why does this post require moderator attention?
You might want to add some details to your flag.

0 comment threads

Sign up to answer this question »

This community is part of the Codidact network. We have other communities too — take a look!

You can also join us in chat!

Want to advertise this community? Use our templates!