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#2: Post edited by user avatar Olin Lathrop‭ · 2021-04-05T13:49:25Z (10 months ago)
  • It depends on what the failure was.
  • Working the hinge could possibly make the little screw come loose quicker. This is the screw that acts as the shaft of the hinge.
  • If the hinge actually broke, then excessive repeated stress is probably the cause. This is more likely to come from too much force trying to open the hinge past its limit than any working of the hinge within its design limits. Some glasses have hinges that deliberately allow some over-opening, but with a higher torque required. This is to minimize stress, and eventual failure. I've had such glasses for enough years now to find that it helps.
  • It depends on what the failure was.
  • Working the hinge could possibly make the little screw come loose quicker. This is the screw that acts as the shaft of the hinge.
  • If the hinge actually broke, then excessive repeated stress is probably the cause. This is more likely to come from too much force trying to open the hinge past its limit than any working of the hinge within its design limits. Some glasses have hinges that deliberately allow some over-opening, but with a higher torque. This is to minimize stress, and eventual failure. I've had such glasses for enough years now to find that it helps.
#1: Initial revision by user avatar Olin Lathrop‭ · 2021-04-05T13:47:53Z (10 months ago)
It depends on what the failure was.

Working the hinge could possibly make the little screw come loose quicker.  This is the screw that acts as the shaft of the hinge.

If the hinge actually broke, then excessive repeated stress is probably the cause.  This is more likely to come from too much force trying to open the hinge past its limit than any working of the hinge within its design limits.  Some glasses have hinges that deliberately allow some over-opening, but with a higher torque required.  This is to minimize stress, and eventual failure.  I've had such glasses for enough years now to find that it helps.